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1.Module 5 - Practice Question Mr. Jay Brown is 66 years of age and his 2020 income is made up of ...

loyment income of $75,800, contributed $6,500 to his RRSP. He also earned interest income from Guaranteed Investment Certificate (GIC) of $3,700 during 2020 and received Old Age Security benefits of $7,400 (because of large business losses during the previous two years, no amount was withheld from the OAS payments). Mr. Brown and his family live in Toronto, Ontario. For 2020, Mr. Brown’s employer withheld maximum CPP ($2,898) and EI ($856) contributions. Other information pertaining to 2020 is as follows: 1. Mr. Brown’s spouse is 59 years old and qualifies for the disability tax credit. Her income for the year totaled $4,500. 2. Mr. and Mrs. Brown have two daughters, Keith, aged 15 and Laura, aged 17. Keith had income of $2,700 for the year while Laura had net income of $3,000. In September 2020, Laura began full time attendance at a Canadian university. Mr. Brown paid her tuition fees of $6,000, of which $3,500 was for the fall 2020 semester. Laura is willing to transfer her tuition credit to her father. 3. The family medical expenses for the year, all of which were paid by Mr. Brown, totaled $3,845. Of this amount, $300 was paid for Keith and $900 for Laura. 4. During the year, Mr. Brown made cash donations to registered Canadian charities in the amount of $2,000. 5. During the year, Mr. Brown made contributions to federal political parties totaling $1,800. Required: Use the above information to determine Mr. Brown’s - Clawback amount for the social benefit repayment - Net income for tax purposes - Federal tax payable before tax credit (Gross tax) - Tax credits available - Federal tax payable for 2020.
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2.Part I. Reaction Paper Read and understand the text below. Follow outline in writing your reaction paper at least 250-750 ...

paper at least 250-750 words. 1. Introduction 2. Thesis Statement 3. Supporting details 4. Conclusion The Digital Divide: The Challenge of Technology and Equity (1) Information technology is influence the way many of us live and work today. We use the internet to look and apply for jobs, shop, conduct research, make airline reservations, and explore areas of interest. We use Email and internet to communicate instantaneously with friends and business associates around the world. Computers are commonplace in homes and the workplace. (2) Although the number of internet users is growing exponentially each year, most of the worlds population does not have access to computers of the internet. Only 6 percent of the population in the developing countries are connected to telephones. Although more than 94 percent of U.S households have telephones, only 56 percent have personal computers at home and 50 percent have internet access. The lack of what most of us would consider a basic communication necessity the telephone does not occur just in developing nations. On some Native American reservations only 60 percent of the residents have a telephone. The move to wireless connectivity may eliminate the need for telephone lines, but it does not remove the barrier to equipment costs. (3) Who has internet access? The digital divide between the populations who have access to the internet and information technology tools and those who dont is based on income, race, education, household type, and geographic location, but the gap between groups is narrowing. Eighty-five percent of households with an income over $75,000 have internet access, compared with less than 20 percent of the households with income under $15,000. Over 80 percent of college graduates use the internet as compared with 40 percent of high school completers and 13 percent of high school dropouts. Seventy-two percent of household with two parents have internet access; 40 percent of female, single parent households do. Differences are also found among households and families from different racial and ethnic groups. Fifty-five percent of white households, 31 percent of black households, 32 percent of Latino households, 68 percent of Asian or Pacific Islander households, and 39 percent of American Indian, Eskimos, or Aleut households have access to the internet. The number of internet users who are children under nine years old and persons over fifty has more than triple since 1997. Households in inner cities are less likely to have computers and internet access than those in urban and rural areas, but the differences are no more than 6 percent. (4) Another problem that exacerbates these disparities is that African-American, Latinos, and Native Americans hold few of the jobs in information technology. Women about 20 percent of these jobs and receiving fewer than 30 percent of the Bachelors degrees in computer and information science. The result is that women and members of the most oppressed ethnic group are not eligible for the jobs with the highest salaries at graduation. Baccalaureate candidates with degree in computer science were offered the highest salaries of all new college graduates. (5) Do similar disparities exist in schools? Ninety-eight percent of schools in the country are wired with at least one internet connection. The number of classrooms with internet connection differs by the income level of students. Using the percentage of students who are eligible for free lunches at a school to determine income level, we see that the higher percentage of the schools with more affluent students have wired classrooms than those with high concentrations of low-income students. (6) Access to computers and the internet will be important in reducing disparities between groups. It will require higher equality across diverse groups whose members develop knowledge and skills in computer and information technologies. The field today is overrepresented by white males. If computers and the internet are to be used to promote equality, they have to become accessible to schools cannot currently afford the equipment which needs to be updated regularly every three years or so. However, access alone is not enough; Students will have to be interacting with the technology in authentic settings. As technology has become a tool for learning in almost all courses taken by students, it will be seen as a means to an end rather than an end in itself. If it is used in culturally relevant ways, all students can benefit from its power.
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3.Hi, can you help me with this discussion board? 1.Describe the use of [a] cowrie shells in Africa OR [b] ...

frica OR [b] wampum in North America as money; including, in particular, how this use changed following the arrival of the white man. 2.Describe [a] the use of the U.S. Dollar as a store of value in two to four other countries OR [b] Bitcoin. 3. Describe the process by which this country used to have a pattern involving bank panics and business cycles. 4.At this time, the breakeven expected inflation rate is 2.2 percent. What are [a] good reasons to suspect this is too high AND [b] too low? 5.What do the successes of Oprah Winfrey, Kanye West, and Michael Jordan in becoming billionaires say about the knowledge of saving and investment of some Americans?
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4.Task 1 You are asked to carry out a study on behalf of a business analytics specialised consultancy on a subsample ...

on a subsample of weekly data from Randall’s Supermarket, one of the biggest in the UK. Randall’s marketing management team wishes to identify trends and patterns in a sample of weekly data collected for a number of their loyalty cardholders during a 26-week period. The data includes information on the customers’ gender, age, shopping frequency per week and shopping basket price. Randall’s operates two different types of stores (convenient stores and superstores) but they also sell to customers via an online shopping platform. The collected data are from all three different types of stores. Finally, the data provides information on the consistency of the customer’s shopping basket regarding the type of products purchased. These can vary from value products, to brand as well as the supermarket’s own high-quality product series Randall’s Top. As a business analyst you are required to analyse those data, make any necessary modifications in order to determine whether for any single customer it is possible to predict the value of their shopping basket. Randall’s marketing management team is only interested in identifying whether the spending of the potential customer will fall in one of three possible groups including: • Low spender (shopping basket value of £25 or less) • Medium Spender (shopping basket value between £25.01 and £70) and • High spenders (shopping basket greater than £70) For the purpose of your analysis you are provided with the data set Randall’s.xls. You have to decide, which method is appropriate to apply for the problem under consideration and undertake the necessary analysis. Once you have completed this analysis, write a report for the Randall’s marketing management team summarising your findings but also describing all necessary steps undertaken in the analysis. The manager is a competent business analyst himself/herself so the report can include technical terms, although you should not exceed five pages. Screenshots and supporting materials can be included in the appendix. Requirements After completing your analysis, you should submit a report that consists of two parts. Part A being a non-technical summary of your findings and Part B a detailed report of the analysis undertaken with more details. Part A: A short report for the Head of Randall’s Marketing Management (20 per cent). This should briefly explain the aim of the project, a clear summary and justification of the methods considered as well as an overview of the results. Although, the Head of Randall’s Marketing Management team who will receive this summary is a competent business analytics practitioner, the majority of the other team members have little knowledge of statistical modelling and want to know nothing about the technical and statistical underpinning of the techniques used in this analysis. This report should be no more than two sides of A4 including graphs, tables, etc. In this report you should include all the objectives of this analysis, summary of data and results as well as your recommendations (if any). Part B: A technical report on the various stages of the analysis (80 per cent). The analysis should be carried out using the range of analytics tools discussed: • SPSS Statistics Ensure that the exercise references: • Binary and multinomial logistic regression • Linear vs Logistic regression • Logit Model with odds Ratio • Co-efficients and Chi Squared • MLR co-efficients • Assessing usefulness of MLR model • Interpreting a model • Assessing over-all model fit with Psuedo R-Squared measures • Classification accuracy (Hit Ratio) • Wald Statistic • Odd ratio exp(B) • Ratio of the probability of an event happening vs not happening • Ratio of the odds after a unit change in the predictor to the original odds • Assumptions • Residuals analysis • Cook’s distance • DfBeta • Adequacy (with variance inflation factor VIF and tolerance statistic) • Outliers and influential points cannot just be removed. We need to check them (typo? – unusual data?) • Check for multicollinearity • Parsimony Write a short and concise report to explain the technical detail of what you have done for each step of the analysis. The report should also cover the following information: • Any type of analysis that might be useful and check whether the main assumptions behind the analyses do not hold or cannot be • Give evidence of the understanding of the statistical tools that you are using. For example, comment on the model selection procedure and the coefficient interpretation, e.g. comment on the interpretation of the logistic regression coefficients if such a method is used and provide an example of • Conclusions and explanation, in non-technical terms, of the main points
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6.3. In England a king hath little more to do than to make war and give away places; which in plain ...

erms, is to impoverish the nation and set it together by the ears. A pretty business indeed for a man to be allowed eight hundred thousand sterling a year for, and worshipped into the bargain!—Thomas Paine Thomas Paine criticizes the king for (1 point) destroying the society with war and waste being dishonest in all his political dealings how little money he puts into the government giving away land to foreign governments
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7.Relaxed and with hair blowing in the breeze, more looks like in the Pantene ad than in the viral video ...

eo of Trump's hair,Relaxed and with hair blowing in the breeze, more looks like in the Pantene ad than in the viral video of Trump's hair, I pedaled over bumpy, dusty dirt paths around my 'dacha', the rural cottage, where like the most of Soviet children were spending the entire summer. The bike wasn't mine. I have never had one. My family couldn't afford it. I borrowed it from my older neighbor. She was at that age when girls are starting to think more about a look and an outfit, rather than enjoying the thrill of a bicycle ride. But her bike wasn't available all the time, so I had to be persuasive to get a vehicle from someone else or to be an outsider-pedestrian. Recently, I was thinking, what if we would have this ‘sharing-mobility back then (to my childhood time). But I was growing up before technology was everywhere and the internet was a thing. In those days, hand brakes and gears were unseen. Riders never wore helmets or special clothing and there were no bicycle lanes marked on streets. We couldn't buy a kick-scooter in a store, so we handmade it from wooden crates from landfills. Bicycles were prized possessions in the neighborhood. Much has changed in the 30 years since on both sides of the ocean. Back in the 2010s, I worked as a project manager of the Russian Innovation Convention in Moscow, со-organized by Skolkovo’s Technopark and took place at the Skolkovo Innovation Center, Russia's version of Silicon Valley. Working at the conventions of 2010 - 2012, I managed guests lists of 10+ thousand participants, young innovators, and entrepreneurs, looking for self-fulfillment in science and high-tech economy. I also worked closely with government officials and high profile speakers from the sphere of innovation. From 2010 to 2012 there were many renowned guests at the Convention, such as Richard Branson(Virgin); Bill Tai (KiteVC), Steve Wozniak (Apple), Harzh Taggar (“Y Combinator”) and so on. For me it was a unique opportunity to see both sides of the coin - get experience, and useful contacts to launch my venture somewhere in the future. The Skolkovo "innovation town" outside Moscow, backed by technology-adherent Russian President Dmitry Medvedev as part of his modernization drive, was supposed to become the country's most ecologically friendly town, with cycle tracks, solar panels, and windmills. These ideas have appeared as a result of encouraging / inspirational visit of Mr. Medvedev and other Russian officials to the original Silicon Valley in California in 2010. I remember when I first visitied Googleplex - Google's campus, it was unbelievable that the bikes come in all shapes and sizes, and are available to pretty much anyone to take just about wherever they please. It was truly brilliant! Google has a large campus that is spread across many miles and buildings. To get from one place to another would be a hassle without the bikes. Over the past decade, corporate bike fleets have become commonplace on Silicon Valley campuses - Apple, Facebook, and others have campus bikes. Dockless and docked bikes have already occupied big cities. Almost 10 years later, Russia's version of Silicon Valley still doesn’t have anything similar. E-bikes are good, but E-scooters might be the new thing. Having ties with my former colleagues at Skolkovo, we are negotiating that the technopark will launch BRiZ e-scooters sharing in 2020. The system should help Skolkovo employees move faster across a fairly large area of ​​the center. BRIZ is a smart dock-less mobility platform, which offers dock-free electric scooter rentals to fulfill short distance, urban and other trips. I am the co-founder and CEO of BRiZ Mobility. But, let's start from the very beginning. I pedaled over bumpy, dusty dirt paths around my 'dacha', the rural cottage, where like the most of Soviet children were spending the entire summer. The bike wasn't mine. I have never had one. My family couldn't afford it. I borrowed it from my older neighbor. She was at that age when girls are starting to think more about a look and an outfit, rather than enjoying the thrill of a bicycle ride. But her bike wasn't available all the time, so I had to be persuasive to get a vehicle from someone else or to be an outsider-pedestrian. Recently, I was thinking, what if we would have this ‘sharing-mobility back then (to my childhood time). But I was growing up before technology was everywhere and the internet was a thing. In those days, hand brakes and gears were unseen. Riders never wore helmets or special clothing and there were no bicycle lanes marked on streets. We couldn't buy a kick-scooter in a store, so we handmade it from wooden crates from landfills. Bicycles were prized possessions in the neighborhood. Much has changed in the 30 years since on both sides of the ocean. Back in the 2010s, I worked as a project manager of the Russian Innovation Convention in Moscow, со-organized by Skolkovo’s Technopark and took place at the Skolkovo Innovation Center, Russia's version of Silicon Valley. Working at the conventions of 2010 - 2012, I managed guests lists of 10+ thousand participants, young innovators, and entrepreneurs, looking for self-fulfillment in science and high-tech economy. I also worked closely with government officials and high profile speakers from the sphere of innovation. From 2010 to 2012 there were many renowned guests at the Convention, such as Richard Branson(Virgin); Bill Tai (KiteVC), Steve Wozniak (Apple), Harzh Taggar (“Y Combinator”) and so on. For me it was a unique opportunity to see both sides of the coin - get experience, and useful contacts to launch my venture somewhere in the future. The Skolkovo "innovation town" outside Moscow, backed by technology-adherent Russian President Dmitry Medvedev as part of his modernization drive, was supposed to become the country's most ecologically friendly town, with cycle tracks, solar panels, and windmills. These ideas have appeared as a result of encouraging / inspirational visit of Mr. Medvedev and other Russian officials to the original Silicon Valley in California in 2010. I remember when I first visitied Googleplex - Google's campus, it was unbelievable that the bikes come in all shapes and sizes, and are available to pretty much anyone to take just about wherever they please. It was truly brilliant! Google has a large campus that is spread across many miles and buildings. To get from one place to another would be a hassle without the bikes. Over the past decade, corporate bike fleets have become commonplace on Silicon Valley campuses - Apple, Facebook, and others have campus bikes. Dockless and docked bikes have already occupied big cities. Almost 10 years later, Russia's version of Silicon Valley still doesn’t have anything similar. E-bikes are good, but E-scooters might be the new thing. Having ties with my former colleagues at Skolkovo, we are negotiating that the technopark will launch BRiZ e-scooters sharing in 2020. The system should help Skolkovo employees move faster across a fairly large area of ​​the center. BRIZ is a smart dock-less mobility platform, which offers dock-free electric scooter rentals to fulfill short distance, urban and other trips. I am the co-founder and CEO of BRiZ Mobility. But, let's start from the very beginning. I am a politician, public servant and started my career as a grassroots organizer in 2006. In the decade since, I have taken part in several political movements, coordinated numerous political events, organized a political party, run for office, and held leadership positions in the federal government. Since I became involved in public service, I’ve been always advocating for government transparency. The information era and its accompanying tech boom expanded my toolkit. From 2013 to 2016, I coordinated grant competitions for youth all over Russia at the Ministry of Education and its subdivision Federal Agency of Youth Affairs. Two of the biggest challenges facing my team were securely collecting and storing personal data of the participants (33 million youth people in Russia) and implementing a transparent, fair process for selecting grant winners and distributing funds to them. Our solution, the Automatic Information System (AIS) "Youth of Russia," was implemented in 2014, and since then this system is operating. This experience was valuable in terms of managing developers' team, develop a user-friendly big data platform, as well as pushing the slow bureaucratic structures on digital reforms. I completed my Master's degree in 2015 and started my PhD, doing my Masters's degree in Public Administration and a Ph.D. in economics simultaneously. I was then recruited by Moscow Government to work on the preparation of Moscow as one of the Host Cities for the 2018 FIFA World Cup. However, sometime later, my application was accepted by three Ivy League universities and I moved to New York to study at Columbia University, School of international and public affairs in 2017. The past year at Columbia University has shifted my academic and professional passions towards the Sustainable Development Goals, among them Sustainable cities and communities (including transportation), 'Gender Equality, and its influence on a broad range of fields. At SIPA, I chose Management & Innovation Concentration. Because my background wasn't in tech, I knew I needed to fill some skill gap areas. So I took the opportunity to load up on courses that focus on innovations, sustainability, and urban policy. One of the extremely useful classes was 'Strategic Management of Information & Communications Technologies for the Public Good with Prof. Robert Z Tumin, where we have been examining different policy and managerial cases, and use of established and leading-edge information and communication technologies, among them in transportation (Uber Case). Another one was 'Implementation of Sustainability Strategies' with Prof. Todd Cort. One of the final research project at that class was related to the environmental impact of transport in Europe and the analysis of the combination of bikes and trains that can provide an alternative to less sustainable modes, such as private motor vehicles. In the Fall of 2018, my final portfolio project at SIPA had transformed into my startup business plan, investor pitch deck, and profound research on the market opportunity and competition. My team and I launched the company in February 2019. In the past 9 months following up on the launch of BRiZ, I have been working on a series of tasks to get the business off the ground. So that included everything from submitting our incorporation documents, raising capital, negotiating with suppliers, implementing operations, and developing partnerships to get the business fully up and running. Now that we have launched, my job is continuing to fundraise, work towards our expansion goals, work with governments and oversee the day-to-day operations. Having a public policy background, I also the one who will manage the implementation of technology that will help the company to work smoothly with regulators. BRiZ’s engineers work on imposing parking restrictions so that scooters can’t be parked in spaces rejected by a city; imposing speed limits on scooters within certain parts of a city, and lock scooters that violate those rules. Besides controlling how its scooters work, BRiZ can share its data with city officials to help cities understand traffic patterns and find the best settings for these green transportation solutions. If we have a good relationship with the city, we’ll be able to find the sensible ground where we’re truly improving transportation. According to my research, made before launching BRiZ, most of the electric kick scooters in the scooter-sharing market were designed with serious downsides, such as short lifespan, loads of unnecessary functions, lacking must-have safety features, etc. So, we recreated something that everyone already knows and creates a functional and smart prototype - more efficient - two times longer lifespan (12 months) and is, therefore, two times more profitable than potential competitors. We are going to start with launching a pilot sharing platforms at the beginning of 2020, in major cities around New York; and in Spring 2020 in several major Russian cities and Skolkovo ‘innovation town’. Now, we are meeting different strategic partners and take negotiations with municipalities. eScooters have flooded the streets of world cities. Cities are relatively down for this new era of transportation. Fans of micro-mobility praise its ability to provide efficient and eco-friendly rides. Opponents have questioned the safety and sustainability of micro-mobility. In media micro sharing mobility as part of the trend of the sharing economy can be described as the future durable trend so as a new version of communism. As a millennial leader thinking about trends transforming the global landscape, I would like to utilize my skills, experience, and expertise in issues relating to the interface between sustainable urban development and transport technologies. I am confident that I would bring a strong foundation in understanding the current and future trends. In my objectives to create the multi-functional platform / system to make our urban logistics safer, cleaner, healthier, fairer, and more productive, and to examine the deeper implications of where this new transportation technology wave has led us—and where we want to go next. I see the common ground and research direction with 'The City Science' and Viral Communications research groups. questions cannot be answered in separation. Working under the mentorship at the Lab I want to continue my interdisciplinary trajectory in academic research and practical work. So, today, I’m back on two wheels, helmet strapped on, following new millennial rules of the road. Relaxed and with hair blowing in the breeze, ride/scoot an electric BRiZ into 2020 to figure out what's going on.
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8.Relaxed and with hair blowing in the breeze, more looks like in the Pantene ad than in the viral video ...

eo of Trump's hair, I pedaled over bumpy, dusty dirt paths around my 'dacha', the rural cottage, where like the most of Soviet children were spending the entire summer. The bike wasn't mine. I have never had one. My family couldn't afford it. I borrowed it from my older neighbor. She was at that age when girls are starting to think more about a look and an outfit, rather than enjoying the thrill of a bicycle ride. But her bike wasn't available all the time, so I had to be persuasive to get a vehicle from someone else or to be an outsider-pedestrian. Recently, I was thinking, what if we would have this ‘sharing-mobility back then (to my childhood time). But I was growing up before technology was everywhere and the internet was a thing. In those days, hand brakes and gears were unseen. Riders never wore helmets or special clothing and there were no bicycle lanes marked on streets. We couldn't buy a kick-scooter in a store, so we handmade it from wooden crates from landfills. Bicycles were prized possessions in the neighborhood. Much has changed in the 30 years since on both sides of the ocean. Back in the 2010s, I worked as a project manager of the Russian Innovation Convention in Moscow, со-organized by Skolkovo’s Technopark and took place at the Skolkovo Innovation Center, Russia's version of Silicon Valley. Working at the conventions of 2010 - 2012, I managed guests lists of 10+ thousand participants, young innovators, and entrepreneurs, looking for self-fulfillment in science and high-tech economy. I also worked closely with government officials and high profile speakers from the sphere of innovation. From 2010 to 2012 there were many renowned guests at the Convention, such as Richard Branson(Virgin); Bill Tai (KiteVC), Steve Wozniak (Apple), Harzh Taggar (“Y Combinator”) and so on. For me it was a unique opportunity to see both sides of the coin - get experience, and useful contacts to launch my venture somewhere in the future. The Skolkovo "innovation town" outside Moscow, backed by technology-adherent Russian President Dmitry Medvedev as part of his modernization drive, was supposed to become the country's most ecologically friendly town, with cycle tracks, solar panels, and windmills. These ideas have appeared as a result of encouraging / inspirational visit of Mr. Medvedev and other Russian officials to the original Silicon Valley in California in 2010. I remember when I first visitied Googleplex - Google's campus, it was unbelievable that the bikes come in all shapes and sizes, and are available to pretty much anyone to take just about wherever they please. It was truly brilliant! Google has a large campus that is spread across many miles and buildings. To get from one place to another would be a hassle without the bikes. Over the past decade, corporate bike fleets have become commonplace on Silicon Valley campuses - Apple, Facebook, and others have campus bikes. Dockless and docked bikes have already occupied big cities. Almost 10 years later, Russia's version of Silicon Valley still doesn’t have anything similar. E-bikes are good, but E-scooters might be the new thing. Having ties with my former colleagues at Skolkovo, we are negotiating that the technopark will launch BRiZ e-scooters sharing in 2020. The system should help Skolkovo employees move faster across a fairly large area of ​​the center. BRIZ is a smart dock-less mobility platform, which offers dock-free electric scooter rentals to fulfill short distance, urban and other trips. I am the co-founder and CEO of BRiZ Mobility. But, let's start from the very beginning. I am a politician, public servant and started my career as a grassroots organizer in 2006. In the decade since, I have taken part in several political movements, coordinated numerous political events, organized a political party, run for office, and held leadership positions in the federal government. Since I became involved in public service, I’ve been always advocating for government transparency. The information era and its accompanying tech boom expanded my toolkit. From 2013 to 2016, I coordinated grant competitions for youth all over Russia at the Ministry of Education and its subdivision Federal Agency of Youth Affairs. Two of the biggest challenges facing my team were securely collecting and storing personal data of the participants (33 million youth people in Russia) and implementing a transparent, fair process for selecting grant winners and distributing funds to them. Our solution, the Automatic Information System (AIS) "Youth of Russia," was implemented in 2014, and since then this system is operating. This experience was valuable in terms of managing developers' team, develop a user-friendly big data platform, as well as pushing the slow bureaucratic structures on digital reforms. I completed my Master's degree in 2015 and started my PhD, doing my Masters's degree in Public Administration and a Ph.D. in economics simultaneously. I was then recruited by Moscow Government to work on the preparation of Moscow as one of the Host Cities for the 2018 FIFA World Cup. However, sometime later, my application was accepted by three Ivy League universities and I moved to New York to study at Columbia University, School of international and public affairs in 2017. The past year at Columbia University has shifted my academic and professional passions towards the Sustainable Development Goals, among them Sustainable cities and communities (including transportation), 'Gender Equality, and its influence on a broad range of fields. At SIPA, I chose Management & Innovation Concentration. Because my background wasn't in tech, I knew I needed to fill some skill gap areas. So I took the opportunity to load up on courses that focus on innovations, sustainability, and urban policy. One of the extremely useful classes was 'Strategic Management of Information & Communications Technologies for the Public Good with Prof. Robert Z Tumin, where we have been examining different policy and managerial cases, and use of established and leading-edge information and communication technologies, among them in transportation (Uber Case). Another one was 'Implementation of Sustainability Strategies' with Prof. Todd Cort. One of the final research project at that class was related to the environmental impact of transport in Europe and the analysis of the combination of bikes and trains that can provide an alternative to less sustainable modes, such as private motor vehicles. In the Fall of 2018, my final portfolio project at SIPA had transformed into my startup business plan, investor pitch deck, and profound research on the market opportunity and competition. My team and I launched the company in February 2019. In the past 9 months following up on the launch of BRiZ, I have been working on a series of tasks to get the business off the ground. So that included everything from submitting our incorporation documents, raising capital, negotiating with suppliers, implementing operations, and developing partnerships to get the business fully up and running. Now that we have launched, my job is continuing to fundraise, work towards our expansion goals, work with governments and oversee the day-to-day operations. Having a public policy background, I also the one who will manage the implementation of technology that will help the company to work smoothly with regulators. BRiZ’s engineers work on imposing parking restrictions so that scooters can’t be parked in spaces rejected by a city; imposing speed limits on scooters within certain parts of a city, and lock scooters that violate those rules. Besides controlling how its scooters work, BRiZ can share its data with city officials to help cities understand traffic patterns and find the best settings for these green transportation solutions. If we have a good relationship with the city, we’ll be able to find the sensible ground where we’re truly improving transportation. According to my research, made before launching BRiZ, most of the electric kick scooters in the scooter-sharing market were designed with serious downsides, such as short lifespan, loads of unnecessary functions, lacking must-have safety features, etc. So, we recreated something that everyone already knows and creates a functional and smart prototype - more efficient - two times longer lifespan (12 months) and is, therefore, two times more profitable than potential competitors. We are going to start with launching a pilot sharing platforms at the beginning of 2020, in major cities around New York; and in Spring 2020 in several major Russian cities and Skolkovo ‘innovation town’. Now, we are meeting different strategic partners and take negotiations with municipalities. eScooters have flooded the streets of world cities. Cities are relatively down for this new era of transportation. Fans of micro-mobility praise its ability to provide efficient and eco-friendly rides. Opponents have questioned the safety and sustainability of micro-mobility. In media micro sharing mobility as part of the trend of the sharing economy can be described as the future durable trend so as a new version of communism. As a millennial leader thinking about trends transforming the global landscape, I would like to utilize my skills, experience, and expertise in issues relating to the interface between sustainable urban development and transport technologies. I am confident that I would bring a strong foundation in understanding the current and future trends. In my objectives to create the multi-functional platform / system to make our urban logistics safer, cleaner, healthier, fairer, and more productive, and to examine the deeper implications of where this new transportation technology wave has led us—and where we want to go next. I see the common ground and research direction with 'The City Science' and Viral Communications research groups. questions cannot be answered in separation. Working under the mentorship at the Lab I want to continue my interdisciplinary trajectory in academic research and practical work. So, today, I’m back on two wheels, helmet strapped on, following new millennial rules of the road. Relaxed and with hair blowing in the breeze, ride/scoot an electric BRiZ into 2020 to figure out what's going on.
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1.AU MAT 120 Systems of Linear Equations and Inequalities Discussion

mathematicsalgebra Physics