Search what-is-the-difference-in-the-function-of-the-spongocoel-central-cavity-of-poriferans-vs-the-gastrovascular-cavity-of-cnidarians

What is the difference in the function of the spongocoel central cavity of poriferans vs the gastrovascular cavity of cnidarians

 
 

Top Questions

1.1) (Ch. 7) Explain what a residual is (also known as residual of prediction). 2) ...

e idea of “least squares” in regression (you need to fully read pp. 200-208 to understand). 3) What does it mean if b = 0? 4) What does it mean when r-squared is 0? What does it mean when r-squared is 1? 5) What is the difference in an unstandardized regression coefficient and the standardized regression coefficient? 6) If a report says test performance was predicted by number of cups of coffee (b = .94), what does the .94 mean? Interpret this. (For every one unit increase in ___,There is an increase in ___ ) 7) If F (2,344) = 340.2, p < .001, then what is this saying in general about the regression model? (see p. 217) 8) Why should you be cautious in using unstandardized beta? (p. 218) 9) (Ch. 8) Explain partial correlation in your own words. In your explanation, explain how it is different from zero-order correlation (aka Pearson r). 10) (Ch. 9) What is the F statistic used to determine in multiple regression? 11) What is F when the null hypothesis is true? 12) In Table 9.4, which variable(s) are statistically significant predictors? 13) In Table 9.4, explain what it means if health motivation has b = .36 in terms of predicting number of exercise sessions per week. 14) What is the benefit of interpreting standardized beta weights? (see p. 264). 15) What happens if your predictor variables are too closely correlated? 16) Reflect on your learning. What has been the most difficult? How did you get through it? What concepts are still fuzzy to you? Is there anything you could share with me that would help me address how you learn best?
View More

4.You conduct a paired samples sample t test where the average of the first score is 3.6 and the ...

age of the second score is 6.3. The standard error of the difference scores is 0.53 and N=15. What is the effect size?
View More

6.Describe the parallels between cell differentiation, nutrient supply, and final cellular state for the majority of cells involved in the ...

he majority of cells involved in the epidermis, hair follicles/hair growth, and nail synthesis/nail growth. How does the structure of spongy bone support the function of the red bone marrow contained within said bone? How do bones, synovial fluid, tendons, ligaments, and articular cartilage work together to allow synovial joint movement? Please explicitly include the bone feature that allows for tendon/ligament attachment. What is the difference in function between the vertebrae and the intervertebral disks in the vertebral column? Please discuss both the connective tissue subtype for each of these features and how the composition of their extracellular matrix contributes to function Describe the extracellular matrix of bone to someone who isn't familiar with anatomy (this should be a general description of appearance/tactile nature, no specific mention of cells or function is needed) How does hair contribute to the sensory role of the integumentary system? (A short explanation is all that is needed, no in-depth description of associated structures is required for full credit) Back when he was 16, Jordan left eye orbit floor was fractured in a bizarre fencing accident, leaving a few fragments behind inside his skull. Assuming the floor was punctured from above in the maxillary bone and no additional bones were broken, where did the bone fragments end up in his skull? (This should be a particular space in the skull, not a separate bone where the fragments are embedded The skeletal and integumentary systems rely heavily on collagen for function - describe one or more features other than ligaments that involve collagen, and how you would expect function to change in someone with EDS that affected the relevant subtype of collagen
View More

8.Question 1: What is a player’s « reaction function » in a Bertrand game ? Question 2: What is a subgame ...

subgame perfect Nash equilibrium? Question 3: In which situations should we need the mixed extension of a game? Question 4: Find, if any, all Nash equilibria of the following famous matrix game: L R U (2,0) (3,3) D (3,4) (1,2) Question 5: What is the difference between a separating equilibrium and a pooling equilibrium in Bayesian games? Question 6: Give another name for, if it exists, the intersection of the players’ best-response « functions » in a game? Question 7: assuming we only deal with pure strategies, the Prisoner’s Dilemma is a situation with: No Nash equilibrium One sub-optimal Nash equilibrium One sub-optimal dominant profile No dominant profile Question 8: If it exists, a pure Nash equilibrium is always a profile of dominant strategies: True False Question 9: All games have at least one pure strategy Nash equilibrium: True False Question 10: If a tree game has a backward induction equilibrium then it must also be a Nash equilibrium of all of its subgames: Tr 2/2 Question 11: The mixed Nash equilibrium payoffs are always strictly smaller than the pure Nash equilibrium payoffs: True False Question 12: Which of the following statements about dominant/dominated strategies is/are true? I. A dominant strategy dominates a dominated strategy in 2x2 games. II. A dominated strategy must be dominated by a dominant strategy in all games. III. A profile of dominant strategies must be a pure strategy Nash equilibrium. IV. A dominated strategy must be dominated by a dominant strategy in 2x2 games. I, II and IV only I, II and III only II and III only I and IV only I, III and IV only I and II only Question 13: A pure strategy Nash equilibrium is a special case of a mixed strategy Nash equilibrium: True False Question 14: Consider the following 2x2 matrix game: L R U (3,2) (2,4) D (-1,4) (4,3) The number of pure and mixed Nash equilibria in the above game is: 0 1 2 3 Exercise (corresponding to questions 15 to 20 below): assume a medical doctor (M) prescribes either drug A or drug B to a patient (P), who complies (C) or not (NC) with each of this treatment. In case of compliance, controlled by an authority in charge of health services quality, the physician is rewarded at a level of 1 for drug A and 2 for drug B. In case of noncompliance, the physician is « punished » at -1 level for non-compliance of the patient with drug A and at -2 level for non-compliance with drug B. As for the compliant patient, drug A should give him back 2 years of life saved and drug B, only 1 year of life saved. When noncompliant with drug A, the same patient wins 3 years of life (due to avoiding unexpected allergic shock for instance), and when non-compliant with drug B, the patient loses 3 years of life. Question 15: You will draw the corresponding matrix of the simultaneous doctor-patient game. Question 16: Find, if any, the profile(s) of dominant strategies of this game. Question 17: Find, if any, the pure strategy Nash equilibrium/equilibria of this game. Question 18: Find, if any, the mixed strategy Nash equilibrium/equilibria of this game. Questions 19 and 20: Now the doctor prescribes first, then the patient complies or not: draw the corresponding extensive-form game (= question 19) AND find the subgame perfect Nash equilibrium/equilibria (=
View More

1.AU MAT 120 Systems of Linear Equations and Inequalities Discussion

mathematicsalgebra Physics